Playing with Pouring

I am intrigued with watercolor pouring as a technique. Very different than my own style, it forces one to really look at the values in a study, and work based solely on those. I am planning to take a short workshop on pouring in late spring, but until then, I thought I would try to understand it a bit by trying some images.

This, my first one, is one of my favorite scenes from the Pyrenees from our trip there two years ago.

First: a photo from the work in progress:

I didn’t have any small thin brushes for the masking, so was trying to get some texture on the old buildings using a combed brush. A bit crude, but applying a few washes after I removed the masking certainly helped.

All in all, not a fabulous painting, but interesting to do, and it will help me work on several aspects of technique including brush control, line, and value/intensity.

Less is More

I’ve been struggling for inspiration for the past couple of months. Just not producing any work that I have been happy with.

A few days ago, I began a study of one of my most oft-painted subjects — the view out my window across a pasture. I began with some washes as an underpainting. When it began to dry, I began to add texture and interest in the washes.

It’s not a great piece, by any means, but it was interesting enough to me to be worth keeping.

It reminded me that sometimes the answer is less detail, not more!