Playing with Pouring

I am intrigued with watercolor pouring as a technique. Very different than my own style, it forces one to really look at the values in a study, and work based solely on those. I am planning to take a short workshop on pouring in late spring, but until then, I thought I would try to understand it a bit by trying some images.

This, my first one, is one of my favorite scenes from the Pyrenees from our trip there two years ago.

First: a photo from the work in progress:

I didn’t have any small thin brushes for the masking, so was trying to get some texture on the old buildings using a combed brush. A bit crude, but applying a few washes after I removed the masking certainly helped.

All in all, not a fabulous painting, but interesting to do, and it will help me work on several aspects of technique including brush control, line, and value/intensity.

Making Do….

I decided to take advantage of what could be the last really nice autumn day last Friday. I packed up my things and went to Whipple Dam State Park, which is just under a half hour from my house. I walked around a bit, enjoyed the leaves and colors and the views, and set up on the beach next to the lake. As I unpacked my travel bag, I discover that everything was in there EXCEPT the sketchbook!!!

The only paper I had was a tiny notepad in my car (sheets measuring about 2″ x 4″!), so I tried to make do with it. Lousy paper, and much to small. But sometimes, you have to work with what you’ve got, right?

Industrial Interlude

I am rather obsessed with flowers this time of year, but did take a break while traveling on a train to New York two weeks ago. I had a limited palette, and only water brushes (which I don’t particularly care for), but am pleased with this laptop sketch on the train.